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Verify complex test data

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Verify server-side functionality
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Test network behavior and functionality
Life-cycle and migration testing
Ensure IFRS compliance standards
Automate & test smart devices
Ensure that data is transmitted correctly
Test your systems and software
Verify server-side functionality
Verify charging Systems
Test network behavior and functionality
Life-cycle and migration testing
Ensure IFRS compliance standards
Automate & test smart devices
Ensure that data is transmitted correctly

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How to Customize your intaQt Test Case Execution Experience

When executing several tests within the same project, it's often necessary to adapt them to changes that arise so that all tests are compatible with each other. intaQt Studio allows you to configure individual scenarios to prioritize test cases, ignore unwanted Scenarios and add custom Context Objects to make sure your tests run smoothly.
To illustrate how you can customize your intaQt test cases executions, we'll use two Feature Files from a small project, which you might recognize from intaQt Studio Tips and Tricks:

intaQt Feature Files

The first Feature File is a Webtest that performs a simple Google search and checks that the first search result matches a text that we want:

The second Feature File tests a Smart Home interface, which reads the temperature from a thermostat display and compares against an expected value:

This Feature File includes two examples we read the values from. We check the values from display1.jpg and check that it is 20 degrees Celsius. Then and we check that display2.jpg shows a temperature of 10.5 degrees Celsius.

We'll execute the Temperature Feature File by right-clicking inside the intaQt Studio editor window and choosing the Run feature:

We see all tests have passed, but we also want to see which scenarios and steps were executed. Therefore, we'll click the Show Passed Test button:

As expected, the two Scenarios showing the different thermostat display values that were defined for our test case. We can further expand these by clicking on the arrow buttons to reveal the results from each Step executed by intaQt:

Executing Multiple Feature Files

intaQt can also execute multiple Feature Files. We can do this by choosing the directory in which we wish to execute the Feature Files, then right-click the directory it and then we can run all Feature Files inside the directory. This will execute three Scenarios -- one Scenario from our Webtest, and the two temperature reading Scenarios:

As you can see, the Webtest Scenario failed on the on browser, search for query Step. When a Step fails, all subsequent steps are skipped:

Editing the Run Configuration

When executing multiple test cases in this manner, that intaQt Studio creates a default Run Configuration. In most cases, the default Run Configuration is sufficient, but under some circumstances, we might want to customize the test run according to our needs.
We can do this by going to the Run Configurations menu and selecting Edit Configurations..., which will bring up a new window:

We had two test runs and for each of those intaQt Studio created default Run Configurations, that look something like this. We'll go through each item within the configurations and explain how they work:


  • The Run Configuration Name can be chosen freely, but it must be unique, otherwise it may conflict with other configurations.
  • The Feature File or directory is the relative path starting from the project root that points to the Feature File or to the directory that we want intaQt to execute.
  • The hostname and port for intaQt that we want our tests to run on. If you have a custom intaQt installation, you may choose a different hostname and the port.
  • The Tags configuration is very important. By default, you will see ~ignored, which means intaQt will always execute tests that are not tagged with the @ignored annotations.

Using Annotations

Let's see how these annotations work by returning to our Google search Feature File. We might choose to ignore a Feature because it always fails. We can annotate it with @ignored and next time we run our entire features directory, we see that this Scenario is no longer executed:

On the other hand, we might want to execute a test based on annotations. For example, we might have a scenario where we want to execute all the ignored files inside our project. We'll select Edit Configurations... again, and delete the tilde (~) before ignored, and then save the configuration:

When we run the project again, now it only runs the annotated test as we expected. Of course, this test fails but it’s interesting for us to see why it fails:

Creating Context Objects

The Google Feature File has two arguments: the search for query, and the expectedFirstResultName. We expected both arguments be references inside of Context Objects for our test run. By clicking on failed step, we can see an excerpt of the intaQt log, which contains an error message:

The problem, as you can see above, is that query and the ‘expectedFirstResultName’ are not yet defined inside our project. That’s why we cannot resolve those properties. One approach to fixing this problem is to define query and expectedFirstResultName as Context Objects inside our project configuration (project.conf):

In our project configuration file, we'll define two Context Objects:
  • For query, we specify "qitasc".
  • For expectedFirstResultName, we expect the first search result to be the QiTASC website, which has the title "QiTASC - the magic of testing".

When we run the Google Webtest again, we'll see a browser window open and the word qitasc are typed into the Google search bar. The first search result was what we wanted:

Conclusion

This article showed a few of the many ways that you can customize your test case execution experience with intaQt. This includes editing Run Configurations so that they ignore (or don't ignore) certain files, creating Context Objects and executing multiple feature files. For more ideas about managing your test cases, check out [intaQt Studio Tips and Tricks](http://www.qitasc.com/articles/20181008-StudioTricks):


Would you like more instructions about creating and executing test cases? Visit intaQt Tutorials on the QiTASC Resource Center for out-of-the box test case examples!